Where’s Winter

The North Shore mountains are home to three ski hills…none of which are operating and February still has a week to go. Although they managed to open for a few short weeks, rain and warm weather has left nothing on the runs but dust and dried up grass, like Mount Seymour pictured here at the base of the lift (1000 metres elevation).

Base of Ski Hill

Base of Ski Hill

The majority of the trail is sub alpine, so there are nearly always views of Vancouver to the south and mountains every other direction. The yellow in the middle of the Vancouver photo are huge piles of sulfur awaiting shipment from Neptune Terminals.

Vancouver

Vancouver

The hike up to the summit is 455 metres higher and out of the ski area to the west. It’s a nice early season training jaunt – usually late April – that whets the appetite for summer scrambles. To be on the safe side I packed along instep crampons and an ice axe along with a snack. Needn’t have bothered. On a round trip of 7.5 K, there might have been 300 metres of snow to contend with and the odd slippery section. Basically, the hike was little different from mid summer when there isn’t a speck of white stuff hanging about. Only a short stretch of 40 metres could be considered a problem as the trail narrows down to half metre ledge but with some snow still there, it is now only two boot widths wide.

Ledge Trail

Ledge Trail

Not once on my journey today did I wonder whether climate change or global warming has managed to play havoc with this winters conditions. It often happens there are very poor snow years, although this one may be close to a record. Since Vancouver and parts of the Lower Mainland depend on the snow pack for water, it may raise a critical shortage during late summer. However, for the moment I’m happy with the early appearance of hiking season.  🙂

Gully

Gully

Northeast

Northeast

Garibaldi

Garibaldi